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SERVICES

DEPORTATION DEFENSE

We are ready to help fight your deportation. Immigration officials have the authority to place non-citizens into deportation proceedings called "removal proceedings" if they believe that the individual is deportable from the United States. Placement in removal proceedings is triggered by some type of encounter with immigration officials, such as an arrest or at the border. Depending on the person's immigration history, immigration officials may detain the individual ​until an immigration judge decides their case. Whether you are detained or not, it is important to contact an experienced immigration attorney as soon as possible.

 

Our attorneys have a proven track record of fighting for people who are facing deportation. Attorney Oscar Escoto uses his experience working alongside immigration judges and knowledge of the court process to help his clients fight their deportation. 

We can help you:

  • request a bond from ICE or the Immigration Judge in order to seek your release from ICE custody;

  • apply for relief with the Immigration Judge, such as asylum, cancellation of removal, adjustment of status, removal of conditions (I-751), and VAWA;

  • reopen your deportation case if you failed to appear in court because you did not receive notice of your hearing;

  • appeal the Immigration Judge's decision if he or she denied your case.

WHEN YOU ARE FACING DEPORTATION, YOU NEED AN EXPERIENCED ATTORNEY BY YOUR SIDE. WE ARE READY TO FIGHT FOR YOU.

PERMANENT RESIDENCY (GREEN CARD)

If you are interested in applying to become a permanent resident (commonly referred to as applying for a "green card"), we are ready to help. Under the U.S. immigration system, certain individuals are eligible to apply for permanent residency without leaving the United States (the process known as "adjustment of status"), while others must depart the United States (the process known as "consular processing"). After reviewing your case, Oscar will explore all your options, thoroughly explain your options to you, and answer all your questions about the process. 

One of the ways to apply to become a permanent resident is to submit a petition on behalf of a family member.

 

If you are a U.S. citizen, you may submit a petition for your:

  • spouse;

  • unmarried children under 21 years of age;

  • unmarried son or daughter 21 years of age or older;

  • married son or daughter of any age;

  • brother and sister (you must be 21 years of age or older); and

  • mother or father (you must be 21 years of age or older).

If you are a permanent resident, you may submit a petition for your:

  • spouse;

  • unmarried child under the age of 21; and

  • unmarried son or daughter21 years of age or older.

If you are interested in exploring your options to become a permanent resident, we are ready to help. 

CITIZENSHIP

Under the U.S. immigration system, there are two ways to become a U.S. citizen: naturalization and derivative/acquired citizenship.

Naturalization

If you are a permanent resident, you may be eligible to apply for naturalization if you:

  • are 18 years of age or older;

  • have been a permanent resident for 5 years or longer (or 3 years or longer if you are married to a U.S. citizen);

  • have continuously resided in the U.S. for 5 year or longer before you apply (or 3 years or longer if married to a U.S. citizen);

  • have been physically present for at least half of the time required for the continuous residence period (at least 30 months if you require a showing of 5 years of continuous residence, or at least 18 months if you require a showing of 3 years of continuous residence);

  • are a person of good moral character;

  • demonstrate an attachment to the principles and ideals of the U.S. constitution;

  • are able to read, write, and speak basic English (English requirement);

  • have knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals, and of the principles and form of government, of the U.S. (civics requirement); and

  • are willing to take an Oath of Allegiance to the U.S.

There are some exceptions available to the standard English and civics requirements listed above if you are 50 years of age or older and have been a permanent resident for a certain amount of years.

Derivative/Acquired Citizenship

 

You may be eligible to derive or acquire citizenship if one of your parents was a U.S. citizen when you were born, or if one of them became a U.S. citizen before you turned 18. If either of these scenarios apply to you, then you might be eligible for derivative or acquired citizenship. 

DACA, TPS, U-VISA, VAWA

Under the U.S. immigration system, there are certain immigration benefits and protections that are available, such as:

  • Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA);

  • Temporary Protected Status (TPS);

  • U-Visa; and

  • Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). 

Please call us to learn more about these benefits and protections and to discuss your eligibility.

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